THE WAITING GAME – TUESDAY WRITING TIP

Do you ever feel like time is skewed?

Despite the fact that we live in such a fast-paced world, we seem to spend more time waiting than ever before…especially if we’re writers.

We wait for agents and publishers to respond to our painfully pondered query letters and meticulously written manuscripts…you know the ones where the story idea came to you in a minute but you spend ten years pulling it all together…writing…rewriting?

Then if we are ‘lucky’ enough to get our manuscript accepted (although years of hard work can’t really be called luck), then we wait for the contract, and the editorial comment. We wait for the cover design, the proofs…and finally, the finished product. But the waiting doesn’t end there. Next we wait for the reviews, the sales figures, the blog responses. We wait to see if our next book will be accepted.

Is it any wonder that writers sometimes feel they are going slowly crazy? I mean, when I was pregnant, I found the waiting hard, but that was only nine months. The birth of a book from initial idea to publication and beyond takes years.

So how do we cope? How do we stop the waiting from eroding our sleep, our confidence, our sanity.

Here’s what I do.

1.    Try not to resort to chocolate…tasty, but not a long term solution (although I’m only human and I do have lapses)

2.    Always have a new Work In Progress that I can immerse myself in

3.    Make a list of where my submissions are so I don’t have to carry this information around in my head and I can try and put it out of my mind.

4.    Keep myself busy doing other things

5.    Find something else to focus my creative energies on (which could be my new WIP, but might be a painting or a sketch)

6.    Walk the dog and the goat…a lot. (Exercise can definitely be a great distraction and it just has a way of making you feel better afterwards.)

7.    Plan a work schedule so I can focus on what’s ahead and realise that my days will be full of challenging, interesting things regardless of the outcomes of submissions or other things I’m waiting for.

8.    Talk with colleagues who are going through the same experience. Nearly every writer you speak to will be waiting for something…even if it’s their next brilliant idea. Sympathy is good. It validates that yes, you really are a patient person, but at some stage, this waiting gets to everyone.

Find a hobby to distract you

9.    Accept that waiting is a major part of this business and that there’s nothing else I’d rather do so I just have to suck it up and move on. There are a lot worse occupational hazards than waiting.

If you have any tips on how to pass the time/stay sane while you’re waiting for responses, we’d love to hear them.

Feel free to leave them in the comments section of this blog.

In the meantime, happy writing…and waiting:)

Dee