PARALLEL IMPORTS ON BOOKS – PC CRIT 3

PC CRIT 3 – THE PRODUCTIVITY COMMISSION’S APPROACH TO EDUCATION

Dear Mr Rudd, Mr Garrett, Mr Bowen and to all supporters of the Arts and Culture in Australia.

Today, I wanted to briefly tackle the topic of education and its relevance to this issue.

On page 1.5 of its report, the Commission states that its brief is to determine whether.

  • the restrictions generate more benefits than costs to the Australian community
  • there are other policy options that could generate greater net benefits.

It goes on to say, that

In making such assessments, the Commission interprets benefits and costs in their fullest sense – that is, covering the value of social, cultural and educational matters, as well as financial or material ones – and assess them within the community-wide framework as required by the Productivity Commission Act 1998.

Educational books currently form around 40 per cent of the total value of books sales.

Even if you discount the huge Australian job losses if the printing and production of books is done offshore, is it not concerning to think of the possibility of our educational books being ‘manufactured overseas’?

Imagine our books being produced overseas in much the same way that most of our consumables are  – by people not familiar with our language and culture – or what it means to be Australian?

How can this be in the best interests of the Australian Learning Community?

How can it be best for the Australian consumer in an educational and cultural sense to have books of any educational benefit manufactured overseas?

Dee White

Author

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2 thoughts on “PARALLEL IMPORTS ON BOOKS – PC CRIT 3

  1. That’s a good point, Dee. I write children’s stories relating to Australia injured wildlife. My aim is to encourage children to learn more about the care and protection of our native animals. I try to write entertaining and funny stories, but some parts are sad and most stories are about injured or sick animas that are rescued by Australian children.

    How are overseas publishers going to produce a story about Australian wildlife?

    I work with a worldwide critique group and American writers have told me how much they love to read about Australia and our way of life, but they’ve also told me they want to read Australian books written by Australians, not by American publishers. They want real Aussie books. If the Australian government take away the restrictions for parallel importation of books, even American’s won’t buy Australian books because they won’t be Australian anymore.

    My American friends, (and I have hundreds,) have told me they love to read books from other countries. They love Australia and want to learn more about our culture. I have many American teachers that have asked me to recommend Australian children’s books for them to read to their class. They wouldn’t be interested in Australian books re written by Americans. They wouldn’t be Authentic, would they?

    Trisha Puddle.

  2. Thanks for your comments Trisha. It’s always good to get personal perspectives on this debate.

    Dee

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